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Business in Huron County, Michigan

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Positive economic activity in a community depends on the success of its private-sector business establishments to develop new and innovative products, provide services, attract investment, and create jobs. Small business establishment, growth, entrepreneurship, and innovation are hallmarks of the American economic system, and internet connectivity, coupled with new technology, devices, and applications, is perpetuating these ideals in new and exciting ways. The data below show the connectivity and use of technology among businesses in the community compared to those in other communities participating in Connected Nation’s Connected program. These data should be used to make informed decisions and implement solutions for improving connectivity in the community. This information was gathered through surveys distributed in the community.

Adoption Barriers Download Speed Cost Satisfaction Public Wi-Fi Websites Communications Tech Skills Training Importance Education Policy Education Support Local Industry Support Entr. Support STEM+C Teleworking Tech. Applications

Broadband Adoption

This chart shows the percent of businesses that subscribe to various types of broadband services or that are without a connection. Fixed connections are those provided by cable, DSL, fiber, or fixed wireless technology while Non-Fixed connections include dial-up, satellite, and mobile-only services. These types of internet services, while providing basic access, can often be plagued by connection latency, have costly monthly data plans, or can be impacted by weather, terrain, large expanses of open water, and other environmental factors.

  Fixed   Non-fixed   No connection
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Barriers to Broadband Adoption

This chart show the primary reason businesses do not or cannot subscribe to broadband. The chart compares businesses in the community to those across other participating communities.

  Don't need it   No computers   Too expensive   Not available   Too complicated   Security risk   The internet is a distraction to staff   Not trained   Other
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Download Speed

Connection speeds can have a major impact on how the internet is used. This chart shows the average reported download speed among businesses with a connection in the community compared to those in other Connected communities.

Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Average Monthly Cost of Internet Service

The cost of service can prevent some from being able to access the internet. This chart shows the average reported monthly cost of service among businesses in the community compared to those in other Connected communities.

Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Service Satisfaction

Competition provides businesses with choices for service, allowing them the ability to switch providers if their current service does not meet their needs. This chart shows the percent of businesses who state that their internet service meets or does not meet their needs, as well as the various reasons why.

  Yes   No

Reasons for Dissatisfaction
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Public Wi-Fi

Public Wi-Fi can assist in creating a better connected community by providing additional access points for those with devices limited by mobile data plans or those without mobile broadband capability.

  Yes   No
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Websites

A website is one of the most basic ways in which a business establishes an online presence. A website provides a “virtual face” for a business. This chart shows the percent of businesses with a website in the community.

  Yes   No
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Digital Communications

Technology coupled with an internet connection provides a myriad of ways to digitally interact with the world or even those in one’s own community. This chart shows the average frequency with which businesses use various digital communications tools. Additionally, the chart below shows the frequency with which residents in the community report that they digitally interact with local and non-local businesses, i.e. those within 50 miles of the community and those further than 50 miles, respectively. Examining the digital interaction of residents and the digital communications tools used by local businesses can help identify ways to increase the online presence of businesses in the community.

  At least once a day   At least once a week   At least once a month   Less than once a month   Never

How Often Households Go Online to Interact with Local and Non-Local Businesses
  At least once a day   At least once a week   At least once a month   Less than once a month   Never
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Employee Tech. Skills and Employer Needs

The technology-related skills necessary to be successful on the job are changing to keep pace with new innovations, tools, and applications that make production and services more efficient. The skills of the workforce should match the needed skills of the employer in order for establishments to take advantage of new technologies. This chart shows the mix of employee technology skills (as indicated by employers) as well as how well employers say those skills match the technology needs of their organization. (Non-Users: Employees that do not need any technology-related skills; Basic Users: Employees that use basic office software, internet browsers, e-mail, or other primary technologies in their job; Moderate Users: Employees that are required to use more advanced software/hardware in their job that may be sector/industry/task-specific; and Advanced Users: Employees that develop, operate, maintain, modify, and manipulate technology systems, software, or hardware.

  Non-User   Basic User   Moderate User   Advanced User
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

How well do the technology skills of your employees, as indicated above, match the technology needs of your business?
  Poor/Faily Well   Well   Very Well/Excellently
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Importance of Technology Training

If technology is ever-changing, and employee technology skills are important to meeting the needs of local businesses, then technology-related training is essential for ensuring employees keep up with the latest technology tools, devices, and applications. This chart examines the importance of technology-related training for employees among local businesses.

  Not Important   Slightly Important   Neutral   Moderately Important   Very Important
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Continuing Education Policy

Growing the technology skills of the workforce is critical to ensure employers have the talent they need to expand and sustain their operations. This chart shows the overall technology-related continuing education policies of local businesses. Businesses were asked to indicate if they require, encourage but don't require, or neither encourage nor require employees to participate in continuing education or training activities.

  Encouraged but not required to pursue   Required to pursue   Neither encouraged or required to pursue
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Continuing Education Support

Employers were asked about the policies they have in place to support continuing education among their employees including time off work, financial support, on-site training by outside experts, and on-the-job training. Employers could also indicate if they did not support employee continuing education in any way. This chart shows the percent of employees in the community that indicate that have each of the four policies in place.

Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Local Industry Support and Collaboration

Institutions of higher education of all types can play a critical role in supporting the talent and workforce needs of local industry. Given this role, it is important for institutions and local economic developers, chambers of commerce, and others to collaborate and keep up with the needs of local employers. The charts above show 1) the percent of institutions of higher education in the community that offer courses and programs that supply local industry with talent, and 2) how well institutions in the community rate their collaboration with local economic development entities.

Higher Ed. Institutions Offering Programs that Supply Talent to Local Industry
  Yes   No   Unsure
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

Please rate how well your institution partners and collaborates with local economic development, workforce development, and similar agencies.
  Poor/Fair   Well   Very Well/Excellent
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Entrepreneurship Support

Institutions of higher education can offer many opportunities to help community entrepreneurs, small businesses, and inventors move ideas from concept to reality. The charts above show the percent of institutions of higher education in the community offering various support programs for entrepreneurs and others. These resources are critical for growing and cultivating new and emerging ideas and businesses from within a community.

Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

STEM+C Development

While the technology skills, training, and continuing education of the current workforce are critical for meeting the needs of new and existing businesses, the cultivation of technology-related skills, interest, and entrepreneurial spirit in the next generation is equally important. This chart shows the percent of institutions of higher education and libraries and organizations in the community offering STEM+C (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Computing) activities and programs to the community’s youth outside of the traditional educational environment.

STEM+C Development among Higher Ed. Institutions
  Yes   No   Unsure

STEM+C Development among K-12 Schools
  Yes   No   Unsure

STEM+C Development among Libraries
  Yes   No   Unsure
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Computer and Internet for Work

Technology on the job is ever-changing as more internet-enabled devices and applications are developed to improve production and efficiency. The charts show the percent of residents in the community that use 1) a computer at work, and 2) use the internet for work, compared to residents of other Connected communities.

Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Teleworking

Teleworking, or telecommuting, refers to working outside of the conventional workplace and communicating with it by way of telecommunications or computer-based technology. Further, telework is a form of organizing and/or performing work, where work, which could also be performed at the employer’s premises, is carried out away from those premises. Teleworking is a spatially flexible work style that typically also involves greater flexibility in one’s daily routine. Teleworkers typically have higher incomes and higher rates of advanced degree attainment. While traditional teleworkers are often thought of as those in management occupations or professional service industries, recently, technology has enabled new opportunities for teleworkers across the occupational and industry sector spectrum. Teleworkers often do not register on typical measures of economic or workforce activity. Economic development strategies traditionally involve the attraction or retention of employers. While this is a critical part of growing a local economy, telework represents an opportunity to attract or retain employees even though their employer may not be located within the community, but only if those employees have access to advanced broadband infrastructure. The charts above show the percent of residents in the community that telework and from where they typically work, compared to residents of other Connected communities. The chart below shows how frequently residents of the community telework.

Rate of Teleworking
  Yes   No   Business Owner   Other

Where Employees Telework
  Huron County, Michigan   All Communities

Frequency of Telework
  Every day   Several days per week   Once per week   Several days per month, but less than once per week   Once per month   Less than once per month
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020

 

Tech. Applications

Beyond a website, there are many internet-enabled technologies that can benefit businesses of all types. These technologies are aimed at increasing revenue and reducing expenditures to give businesses a competitive advantage. This chart shows the use and interest in the variety of technologies among businesses in the community.

  Currently Using   Not Using but Will in 1 Year   Not Using but Will in 2-5 Years   Not Using, No Plans, but Interested   Not Interested
Huron County, Michigan Date Range: 11/1/2019 to 8/1/2020, All Communities Date Range: 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020